NINTENDO’S SHARE PRICE HIT BY BAD REVIEWS ON SUPER MARIO RUN
Super Mario Run was released on 15 December and it seems that reactions are putting a bad light on its producer. Nintendo’s shares have fallen by 11% since the game had been released. Even though the company made a big step with this first full venture into mobile gaming, its first app currently has an average rating of average 2.5 stars on Apple’s app store where it’s only available. Players are unsatisfied with the construction of the game where the first three levels could be played for free and be completed too quickly, while the full game costs 10$ which is called to be expensive compared with other games on the store. “A $10 upfront cost to unlock the game is a huge ask and one that flies in the face of current mobile games being free-to-play,” said Daniel Ahmad, an analyst for researcher Niko Partners. “Nintendo needed to do more to let people know what they would get if they paid for it,” he added. Critics also went to the game’s need for a constant internet connection which is a limitation to where and when it could be played. Despite the negative reaction, Super Mario Run was downloaded more than 37 million times in its first three days and topped the charts for most profitable games in many countries.

 

UBER REFUSING TO TAKE SELF DRIVING CARS OFF ROADS
After Uber has been told its self-driving cares are illegal, the company ignored the demand to take them off San Francisco’s roads. The Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) demands from Uber to have a test permit for self-driving which Uber declined to get. As the permit costs $150 for 10 vehicles, Uber states how it doesn’t need to have a permit since it applies to cars that could operate without monitoring of a human driver while Uber’s cars have a safety human driver at the wheel. California’s attorney general – the state’s most senior government lawyer – said Uber must cease the driving immediately or face further action. Uber’s vice-president of Advanced Technologies, Anthony Levandowski, said that Uber had respect for officials, but that the regulations were irrelevant to its cars. “You don’t need a belt and suspenders if you’re wearing a dress,” he told reporters. Levandowski made a comparison with electric car company Tesla whose cars come with an Autopilot, a feature which takes control of the vehicle. Autopilot does not require a permit and Uber argued its cars should be treated the same way. Uber requested clarification regarding to this issue from the DMV. On the other hand, Google, whose cars have a human driver behind the wheel at all times, have applied for and obtained the permit.

 

FACEBOOK ACCUSED OVER WHATSAPP TAKEOVER
European Commission says Facebook misled it during its investigation of the company’s takeover of WhatsApp in 2014. This August, WhatsApp said it would link users’ phone numbers with their Facebook profile which would lead to an improved service, such as providing “more relevant” friend suggestions, letting businesses send adverts directly to users, and also by dealing more effectively with spam and abuse. The Commission now believes that Facebook gave them incorrect information when in 2014 the company said such action is impossible to conduct. During merger investigations, companies are obliged to give the Commission accurate information, so if the Commission comes to conclusion that it was definitely misled, Facebook could lose up to 1% of its turnover which will sum to hundreds of millions of euros. Facebook says that they only discovered a way to link this two accounts earlier this year, and not back in 2104 when the acquisition happened. Facebook’s due to date to respond is by 31 January 2017. A spokesman from Facebook said: “We’re pleased that the Commission stands by its clearance decision, and we will continue to cooperate and share information officials need to resolve their questions.”

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